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Wyatt Client Update: Controlled Substances Requirements Officially Change

Wyatt Client Update: Controlled Substances Requirements Officially Change

Yesterday evening Governor Beshear signed HB 217 (the HB 1 “clean-up” Bill) and the revised KBML and KASPER regulations.  Because of the emergency clause attached to HB 217 and because the Regulations were approved during session, all went into effect as of yesterday evening.  

Key points

  1. The prescribing standards have been removed from the statute and incorporated into the licensing board’s regulations;
  2. Hospitals and LTC facilities are no longer required to report dispensed and subsequently administered doses of Schedule II controlled substances and Schedule III controlled substances containing hydrocodone into the KASPER system;
  3. KASPER queries now only require a 12 month “look-back” period instead of “all available data on the patient;”
  4. The old “HB 1” requirements for Schedule II controlled substances and Schedule III controlled substances containing hydrocodone are inapplicable to prescribing resulting in the direct administration of a controlled substances to patients in hospitals and LTC facilities if a KASPER report is placed on the patient’s chart within 12 hours of admission;
  5. Unless otherwise meeting an exception in the regulations, all discharge prescriptions from the hospital or LTC facility setting will require compliance with the requirements (there is an exception to permit a 14 day prescription of a Schedule II c.s. or Schedule III c.s. containing hydrocodone in any patient having undergone an operative or invasive procedure or delivery);
  6. Hospitals may, through their CMO or other physician designee, institute “institutional” KASPER accounts in compliance with the specifications outlined in 902 KAR 55:110 (the KASPER regulation); and
  7. The KBML regulations have been substantially revised and no longer apply to Schedule V controlled substances; the majority of the requirements relate to Non-Cancer Pain.


Please see the “Update for Physicians” hand-out which has been revised and is intended to serve as a “cheat sheet” for physicians. 

 

-Roz Cordini